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DEAR: Further exhumation of Kitty Jay
Stephanie Black
This is a rotten book.

It lies buried in a pile of earth, waiting to be exhumed, examined and reburied.

The book is loosely based around
Kitty Jay, a character from a story stemming from Dartmoor, England. It is represented in the form of a map to reflect its geographical specificity. The protagonist suffered endless indignities, culminating in her suicide, burial, exhumation, examination, reburial and subsequent recognition as a tourist attraction. Her story is told through fragmented text and image, which mirror the half-remembered, layered and flexible nature of local tales. The story is told largely visually, through sequential imagery featuring artefacts and telling instances that the viewer is asked to link together into a story. The book therefore exists in conjunction with the information readily available; in the story’s very own Wikipedia entry (Jay’s Grave, if you’re interested), published interpretations and verbal storytelling.

A further incidence of excavation is added through the display of the piece. The viewer is welcome to dig up and unfold the soggy mess. This asks a lot of the viewer, but is intrinsic to reclaiming an awful story with a happier outcome. They become complicit in the ghastly farce of burial and reburial, with their interaction contributing to the decay of the fragile form. The difference this time is subtle reparation:
DEAR lies in consecrated earth and will eventually turn to dust, hopefully calling a halt to the cycle of burial and exhumation. Kitty has also been given the choice of a noose or a tea bag of rue.

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Sketchbook Series:“Hypno-Glossary” (2012)
Lynn Imperatore
These are my sketch glossary of visual images from dreams. An attempt to skip the narrative reordering and retelling – to transcribe my night images by re-imagining one kind of wholly imaginary view into another (less fleeting) imaginary vision.

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Sketchbook Series:“Journal-isms” (2012 -)
Lynn Imperatore
I am currently engaged in a practice-led PhD focused through drawing. The present title for my research is - Out of the Corner of the Eye/Out of the Corner of the “I”: An enquiry into imagination at the edges of attention.

In the midst of this project, I find that what is most instructional is not the studio works – the art with a capital A – but in what arises from sketches in my journal. There,
I compose and conduct experiments. I draw things I’ve seen in my dreams, and it seems at times that I encounter in the day/world something I’d previously sketched from dream visions. I draw from life or from reproductions of artists’ work - and later see a version of what I’ve drawn later in a dream. I draw, too, from the dream-like world of renaissance art - in hopes then to learn more of employing visual designs to transcribe or translate the unseen topography of the soul. I draw in the night when I cannot sleep, though I’d prefer sleep. It’s rich terrain. It’s ongoing.

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Sketchbook Series:“Sibling Reveries ” (2012 -)
Lynn Imperatore
My sister Jill came just after me in birth order. She was born with both physical and mental disabilities. In more recent years it seemed that her body was aging at an accelerated rate that outpaced her actual years. Then last winter, she lay down to take a nap - and never woke up. For her it was a graceful passing, one that spared her a future of pain or invasive medical interventions which surely would have overwhelmed her capacity to comprehend or tolerate emotionally.

Yet there was still a shock of sadness for the rest of us - the other five siblings - as she was the first to go. So I went back to childhood photos - to re-cover them through drawing, to situate her place in my life, and mine in hers back into a time when there were just us three older sisters. In drawing, I came to recall Jill in moments when she was still free of the troubles ahead imposed by the peculiar genetic configurations of her body and mind.

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