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HATCH Online Artist-in-Residence Programme
The vision behind the idea to have a rolling HATCH Online Artist-in-Residence Programme is to provide a flexible platform and format within which to accommodate and encourage a wide range of practice and approaches to drawing-as-research.

Each resident artist will themselves propose a specific project with an emphasis on the use of drawing as the tool for exploration, practice, research and investigation. Updates and outcomes will be shared in conversation with the HATCH community throughout the duration of their project period. The Artists involved in the project may be resident online anywhere in the world.
 
Artists-in-Residence:
Hayley Potter
Penny Somerville
Karen Mead
Hayley Potter
April - June 2014
Penny Somerville
May - June 2013
Karen Mead
April - May 2013

Sailing to Byzantium : Patty Hudak 2015
25 meters by 3 meters wide long, this work represents William Butler Yeats’ metaphorical journey through life, as represented by the passage of time in the waves of the material of fabric.

Painted with the calligraphic brushstroke that I have acquired during my 8 years in China, I am using the brushstroke to tap into the emotional process we experience in both contemporary and ancient culture. In China, the brushstroke represents the state of mind of the artist; the long, thin brush sensitively records the feeling within an artist. The artist must calm her mind to tap into the qi, the universal energy that gives substances their character. If I can reach this state of mind with the brush, I am communicating something more than my current state of emotion, something more internal, as present within the best poetry and art of all cultures.

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In this way, I too, like Yeats, I am trying to reach Byzantium. The process in this piece required a physical and mental effort that took me away from the daily cares and distractions, and brought me into the thinking space of the creative historical masters. Art and poetry give us the opportunity for mortality or at least a more permanent sense of beauty. As an artist, I have an opportunity to tap into the sea of this kind of collective thinking, although the attaining the level of perfection of the ancient masters is our dream, it is rarely our reality. In the heart of the artist is this desire to reach a state where the flow of universal energy is present, and able to connect timelessly with the state of mind of others.

Yeats felt his body withering through time, even as his heart and mind grew wiser. We have the longing for a lasting perfection that goes beyond personal ego and vanity, and into something more universal, such as art and poetry can do.

Patty Hudak
Artist in Residence
Harrow Beijing International School

www.pattyhudak.com


HATCH @ RWA 'The Power of the Sea'
Members of HATCH in residence at the RWA during their exhibition
The Power of the Sea 3-5 May 2014 (in conjunction with the Bristol Art Weekender) and 21-22 June 2014, working on drawings and other projects, related to the exhibition and its themes.

Over the two weekends visitors were invited to play a revised version of the board game ‘Battleships’, designed by
Anwyl Cooper-Willis. This one came complete with added 'Omphalos" (plughole) – if enemy shot hit their opponent’s plughole, it drains the sea and so leads to total loss and loss of game, stranding that player’s fleet, and leading to loss of the game.

Lynn Imperatore’s drawing project complemented the exhibition’s title perfectly, and is based on recollections of a childhood seaside home that was swept into the Atlantic by what came to be known as the Ash Wednesday Storm (March 1962) along the mid-Atlantic coastal US, before crossing over to reach Cornwall, A recurring theme in her work, Lynn used silverpoint to draw the house along its imagined journey over the sea, on prepared and folded to reference ‘map’ formats. Nearby, Midge Naylor also worked paper of a similar format to explore memories of the marine space of her childhood (the Scottish East Coast) – the site where her young traumas and trepidations were played out. During the residence, Midge used music evocative of that place to respond with charcoal on a long scroll of paper, exploring emotive and memory-boosting power of music in text and mark.

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Frankie Partridge, assisted by Penny Clark and Theo Wood, produced lengthy drawings of marks made by the wake of a ferry ship on the surface of the ocean. The piece continues the theme of water within Frankie’s work, and visually exposes the successive movement of waves through time. Time was also a central concern of the offsite project from Sophie Morrish, conducted in North Uist, and running alongside our presence within the RWA galleries by way of regular online updates of her progress. This suite of drawings is part of Sophie’s ongoing engagement with the natural world, that which is central to her practice. The drawings produced reflect the impending danger and developing fear of the incoming tide between Heisgeir (the Monach Islands) and safety of Ceann Ear, and having trusted advice on the tides which –on this occasion – went alarmingly awry. More details of this adventure and the drawings produced can be found: http://sophiemorrish.blogspot.co.uk/

Using the idea of the sea as a vehicle for communication,
Victoria Walters furnished an oversized bottle as receptacle for messages contributed by visitors. ‘Sea-Mail’ is part of a planned remembrance of those who died aboard the RMS Titanic. These messages and drawing (on dissolving stationary) will be put to sea from Southampton Quayside, as symbolic gesture ephemeral, floating memorial. The piece seeks to draw attention to the energy and formidable circulatory force of the sea and the history of people’s attempts to harness or navigate it, in this case with devastating results.

In contrast,
Arantxa Echarte’s ‘Postcards from the Sea’, used the postcard format to communicate a different perspective entirely; that from within the sea. These featured photographs taken by Gary Anderson of the Outdoor Swimming Society, and were available for visitors to collect, and contribute their own to the project (http://www.arantxaecharte.com/?page_id=814). Stephanie Black’s activities also explored different perspectives, using drawing to explore the concerns surrounding longline fishing and its impact on seabirds. As the project progressed, it adopted the position of ‘bird scarer’ (recently proven successful in preventing seabird ‘bycatch’). Steph’s project reinterpreted this further as a warning, where albatrosses wreak havoc upon human folly. It will mutate further in due course.

We were also visited by Danish HATCH member
Courtney Coyne Jensen, who brought her prototype of 'Doggerland'; an airline luggage-sized prototype of a planned installation. The work refers to the time when UK and Denmark were one land mass, as well as threats from current rising sea levels resulting due to polar ice cap melting. Courtney arrived with seawater and sand from Denmark - while we provided the same from our local seascape. In the centre of the piece, was a slot with a block of ice (tinted with some blue food colouring), placed so that as it melted you can observe the blue water mingling with both territories. The player chooses a flag and plants it in the sand that they believe to be either DK or UK. As the piece spins, nationalism splashes and melts – becoming redundant as the sand and flags wash out to "sea".

As Courtney writes:

    "Sand and sea are sourced from Denmark’s west coast and UK’s east coast, and are placed within a custom ‘game board’ formed of acrylic and ice. The work invites people
    into a round of ‘serious play’, considering fluctuating relations between DK and UK relative to the North Sea. It offers playful, critical speculation on DK-UK coastal boundaries;
    from Doggerland, to Danelaw, to the British Wars, to today’s offshore oil zones, and impending flooding. It confronts nationalism in light of global climate change’s rising waters."

These events were accompanied by ethno-musicologist
Cecilia Quaintrell’s recordings of the traditional songs of the (now lost) pearl divers of Bahrain, a beautiful but mournful reminder of an extinct industry –and dying song tradition –from her doctoral research. Both weekends provided the opportunity for the discussion of drawing from varied disciplinary perspectives, and for development of possible future research projects.

HATCH @ RWA : Power of the Sea: June 2014


HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab
HATCH members were involved in the ongoing Drawing Lab Project that was part of the recent Drawn 2013 Exhibition at the Royal West of England Academy (23rd March – 2nd June, 2013).

The Drawing Lab was a designated interactive artist-led studio space designed to encourage audience participation and interaction. The space was open to the public throughout the exhibition in order to demonstrate and encourage various drawing activities in the studio and around the building.
HATCH Project members were drawing in the galleries, as well as conducting drawing exercises and games on Saturday and Sunday 20-21 April, and Monday & Tuesday 6-7 May. Informal discussions around drawing-related issues such as the sketchbook, drawing and photography, and other aspects of drawing practice and research were part of the HATCH programme.

Images from 'HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab'


Additionally,
HATCH researcher, Kyra Pollitt (PhD researcher University of Bristol) curated “Action/Assemblage: Drawing Together” - an event/project which showcased practitioners of ‘Signart’ – a form of poetry created and delivered entirely in British Sign Language. As part of this two-day AHRC-funded ‘happening’, members of HATCH were present to draw - as record, investigation and response to these Signartists’ gestural and embodied poetic expressions.

HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab : portraits : May 2013
HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab : Signart : May 2013
HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab : April 2013
HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab : May 2013
HATCH @ RWA Drawing Lab : The Post Office in the Drawing Lab


Predella 2011-2012
Lynn Imperatore
I have always been deeply affected by the narrative paintings of the Renaissance. This has nothing to do with the religious mythologies that I do not subscribe to – and everything to do with being captivated by these extraordinary works as acts of imagination – by the artist’s endeavour to conjure into being some moments of mystery that no one has ever actually glimpsed.

This term
predella denotes the section at the base of an altarpiece, where decorated panels depict scenes or subtexts tangentially connected to the more fixed narratives connected to main panel or panels. (During the Renaissance, such ecclesiastical commissions contractually dictated specifics and conditions of compositions - figures, colour, scale, etc.) It was only in the predella panels that the painter was able to express more freely out of an unfettered imaginal vocabulary.

These drawings sit within of a larger project - a subtext of imagination that might sit below or apart from the doctrines of the concrete. I am trying to document some of the fleeting data of the imagined; the dream, the transience of memory, the glimpse of peripheral vision.


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Drawing Into Knowing : A Project
My fellow
HATCH editor, Steph Black, and I are both involved in practice-led research that centres around drawing. By drawing, I mean more conventional approaches - the hand-hitting–the-paper method - drawing that transcribes accounts of vision in a manual tactile way. Both of us regard - and employ - drawing as a tool for exploration, a kind of raw material of thought-made-visible. Like John Berger’s description of drawing as “burrowing under the apparent” - it is a means for us to unearth new knowledge. Over the past few years, we’ve had many conversations about our research into, through, and about drawing. A vital criteria in this pursuit is an openness to evolution within a drawing. We both favour an emphasis on discovery rather than on representation.
We wondered what we might further uncover by going out and drawing together.

So this past summer (2012) we devised this project in order to jointly and actively explore and examine our ideas around drawing, and the points of agreement as well as points of divergence, within our drawing practices. Simply put - we wanted to engage in drawing as process to explore what actually happens - and what we find out - when we draw. Doing this side-by-side and in conversation has proved very useful for uncovering and articulating an understanding of our methods and beliefs about drawing. Call it a practice-led ‘buddy system’.

These drawings are the raw data of what was subsequently written up, power-pointed and presented at the DRN/2012 Conference in Loughborough in September 2012 (see Drawing Into Knowing under
Researchfor the full illustrated paper). Included here are some of the unedited traces of days out and about (and on-going) as we continue to draw our way around Bristol - side-by-side and in conversation..

Lynn Imperatore

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